Massachusetts suggests body cams for cannabis delivery amid privacy concerns

Massachusetts suggests body cams for cannabis delivery amid privacy concerns

The organization in Massachusetts that oversees cannabis regulations (the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission, because apparently they’re fond of alliteration up there) has posted some suggested regulations for cannabis delivery in the state, and one plan in particular has raised some hackles among privacy advocates. The MCCC suggests that maybe, people who deliver cannabis should wear video cameras, both on their body and their vehicle, with the videos made available to law enforcement on request.

Law enforcement says that the cameras will help — they’re suggesting that there’s crime around illegal cannabis, and they’re saying that the violence might extend into legal business. That’s a bit farfetched (we’ve ordered legal cannabis to our curbside before, and neither the buyers or the sellers here in Southern California seemed very prone to violence at all), but it’s true that having the cameras would definitely prevent problems (or at least help the police figure out what to do if there are issues).

As you might imagine, however, lots of people take issue with the idea of every legal cannabis delivery being video recorded from multiple angles. The ACLU has already spoken out, saying (correctly) that legalization is intended to prevent crime in the first place, and all video cameras would do is invade privacy, and possibly even give police more reason to go after minority groups that are already punished by the War on Drugs.

The regulations put out by the MCCC are just suggested, and they’re set to be examined again later this month, so we’d expect that after that review, there will probably be enough of an issue here that Massachusetts likely won’t require cameras on every legal cannabis transaction. If the regulations are approved, however, and you live in the Bay State, you might think about driving yourself to a dispensary, instead of getting yourself on camera buying legal weed.

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