Canadian police say there's been no change in drugged driving after legalization

Canadian police say there's been no change in drugged driving after legalization

Canada went fully legal on October 17, and despite concerns about widespread access to marijuana causing problems with more drugged drivers, Canadian police have reported that so far, that’s not the case. An analysis by the CBC says that in many of Canada’s provinces, including Manitoba and Vancouver, police agencies are reporting no change at all in drugged driving behavior.

It’s hard to say exactly what is happening here — just because police agencies aren’t seeing more drugged drivers doesn’t necessarily mean it’s happening (or hasn’t happened in the past). There’s definitely not a growth in the behavior, however, which is what a lot of legalization naysayers raised concerns about. Either legal cannabis users are responsible enough to not go driving around after using (which is hopefully the case — cannabis can definitely impair some psychomotor performance, though much less than alcohol does), or the effects of legalization just aren’t big enough to make a difference.

Either way, this is great news — it means that some of the worst fears of those against legalization were exactly that: just fears. Considering that the same is true in the US so far, it appears that using this worry of increased vehicle accidents as a barrier against legalization doesn’t exactly stand up to the science.

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